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Hurricane hacks for preparing for a storm

Posted: 11:35 AM, May 28, 2018
Updated: 2018-11-27 13:53:59Z

We've been sharing information on how to keep you safe during a storm, but now we want to show you some low-tech ways to get through a storm.  Dani Beckstrom has some hurricane hacks.

Here's a tip that's worth a lot, but it will only cost you a penny!  A cup, some water, and a penny could keep your family from getting sick after the storm.

Just freeze a cup of water and put a penny on top of the ice.  Now, put that back in the freezer.  You can go ahead and do this today while it’s fresh in your mind.

If you have to evacuate, you might not know if the power goes out.  So that penny will let you know if the food in your freezer is safe to eat.  If the penny has moved further into the cup, this could mean there was an extended power outage causing the water to melt and refreeze.

If the water ever melted, micro-organisms could multiply and cause food poisoning.

You may be wondering: why a penny?  Because copper allows heat to flow normally, where as a quarter might freeze quicker, giving you a false sense of security with the safety of your food.

You should also put some items from your fridge into your freezer if you evacuate, like milk and fresh meat and chicken, to keep them at a safe temperature longer.

Since you're in the freezer, go ahead and fill zipper bags about three-quarters full of water, and put them in the freezer. This not only helps keep your freezer cold longer during a power outage, it also gives you extra drinking water.

Remember during Irma when the shelves were dry? By doing this, you can ensure you have some extra water on hand. Don't forget: you can also fill the bags with ice.

We've all heard you should fill your bathtub with water so you can flush your toilet.  So since you're filling that, why not fill your washing machine with ice and turn it into a cooler?  Just put stuff in there you want to keep cool, and close the lid. 

Don't worry, the machine is designed to drain water, which it will do when the ice starts to melt.

Now let's say your power went out, and now you're sitting in the dark.  How do you get some light in?  It's easy: tape a flashlight to a bottle or jug of water and it's an instant lantern. You can also use the flashlight on your smartphone to do this.

Don't want to waste the batteries in a flashlight?  No problem, use the sun!  Just get some solar powered yard lights and put them outside during the day to charge.  At night, bring them in to light up your home. 

These are just some of the ways you can get ready for a storm.  Remember, some of the most effective tools to keep you safe and comfortable may already be at your fingertips.

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2018 STORM NAMES

Alberto Leslie
Beryl Michael
Chris Nadine
Debby Oscar
Ernesto Patty
Florence Rafael
Gordon Sara
Helene Tony
Isaac Valerie
Joyce William
Kirk


HURRICANE TERMS TO KNOW

Tropical Storm WATCH: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within the specified coastal area within 48 hours.

Tropical Storm WARNING: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected within the specified coastal area within 36 hours.

Hurricane WATCH: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible somewhere within the specified coastal area. A hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

Hurricane WARNING: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified coastal area. A hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.