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Odette becomes post tropical... this is the last update

Odette becomes post tropical... this is the last update
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Posted at 4:59 PM, Sep 17, 2021
and last updated 2021-09-18 16:56:49-04

UPDATE 9/18/21 5 PM

Odette has now become a post tropical cyclone located to the south of Nova Scotia. Wind remains at 45 mph with tropical storm force wind extending 205 miles from its center. The cyclone has developed a frontal structure and has completed its extra tropical transition. It is now moving to the ENE at 18 mph and is expected to move toward the east and then slow down early next week. By Sunday night and Monday what is left of Odette will be south of Newfoundland so effects may be felt there. Swells generated by Odette are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions across the Mid Atlantic and northeast coasts of the United States through Sunday.

FOX 4 METEOROLOGIST ERIC STONE

UPDATE 9/18/21 11 AM

Tropical Storm Odette continues to move quickly to the northeast away from the United States at 17 mph. Maximum sustained wind is 45 mph. Strong wind shear has pushed all of the convection to the east of the center as Odette is on its way to become extra tropical. Odette will move more to the ENE tomorrow and move to the south of Newfoundland in a couple days. Tropical storm force wind extends 195 miles from its center. Swells generated by Odette are affecting portions of the United States Mid Atlantic coast and are expected to spread northward to portions of the U.S. Northeast and Atlantic Canada coasts during the weekend. High surf and dangerous rip currents are expected through the weekend.

FOX 4 METEOROLOGIST ERIC STONE

UPDATE 9/17/21 11PM

Odette has changed very little since 5pm. It is being sheared by WSW winds which is pushing the storms sell to the east of the center of circulation. Odette is already becoming extratropical as it moves away from the U.S. No threat to SWFL.

FOX 4 METEOROLOGIST CINDY PRESZLER

FIRST UPDATE 9/17/21 5 PM

Tropical Storm Odette is now our 15th named storm of the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane season. It is located about 225 miles SE of Cape May, New Jersey and is moving to the northeast at 15 mph. The circulation of Odette has become more well defined throughout the day and deep convection around its center has prompted the National Hurricane Center to name this a tropical storm. There is a frontal boundary draped around the northern and western side of the circulation which is causing the convection to be sheared off to the northeast of the center. Odette is over the warm water of the gulf stream currently which might allow some strengthening before it gets picked up by a trough that will accelerate Odette to the northeast. Odette will become extra tropical sometime Saturday as some forecast models have it impacting Newfoundland with wind and rain much like Larry did. The only effects here in the United States will be continued large swells along the United States Mid-Atlantic coast and are expected to spread northward to portions of the U.S. Northeast and Atlantic Canada coasts during the weekend. High surf and rip current conditions will be likely through this weekend.

FOX 4 METEOROLOGIST ERIC STONE

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