Lung Cancer Research

A Look at Latest Advances in Lung Cancer Research and an Inspiring Story
 
Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among all Americans - more than breast, colon and prostate cancers combined. And, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths for Hispanic men and the second leading cause of death for Hispanic women – many of whom are younger and sicker when diagnosed. Lung cancer will kill nearly 160,000 Americans this year, according to the Lung Cancer Foundation of America.
 
Yet, lung cancer remains the forgotten cancer due in part to a five-year survival rate of only 15%, which means there are few survivors to stand up and speak out. And, there is also the stigma associated with the lung cancer – that only those who smoke will get the disease, so in some way they are responsible for their illness. The truth is that 65 percent of lung cancer patients either never smoked or quit smoking years ago.
 
Another misconception about lung cancer is that there is not much hope once you are diagnosed. And, while the statistics are a reminder of the severity of the disease, advances in lung cancer treatments are helping change the outcome for providing much needed hope for all diagnosed patients.
 
Even with new precise treatments providing so much hope to lung cancer patients – there are still many unanswered questions, especially because these treatments do not work for all lung cancer patients.Researchers are on the precipice of lung cancer breakthroughs and Lung Cancer Foundation of America works to fund research for these lifesaving treatments.
 
During this tour medical oncologist, Dr. Gilberto Lopes, will discuss the advances emerging from annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), how innovative approaches to diagnosing and treating lung cancer is saving lives, and how the Lung Cancer Foundation of America is working to fund life-saving research. He will be joined by lung cancer patient, Sandy Baza, who will discuss her story and how lung cancer research has given her new breath.
 
INTERVIEW WITH:
Gilberto Lopes (pronounced: lopes like ropes) MD, MBA, FAMS, a medical oncologist, is the medical director for international programs and associate director for Global Oncology at the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and associate professor at the Miller School of Medicine.
 
Maria Elena Uruza is a non-smoker, who was diagnosed with lung cancer at 46.
 
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