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Beryl redevelops into a Subtropical Storm

Posted at 11:23 AM, Jul 05, 2018
and last updated 2018-07-14 20:20:08-04

UPDATE: 5PM Sunday July 14:

The remnants of Beryl have redeveloped into a Subtropical Storm heading northeast away from the US. Winds are currently at 40 mph moving at 14 mph toward cooler water in the northern Atlantic. Beryl is expected to maintain strength through Sunday and then gradually weaken to a remnant low as it encounters cooler water by Monday. No threat to the US. 

UPDATE: 11PM Saturday July 7: 

Beryl is a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph and moving quickly west northwest at 18 mph. The storm is expected to continue to battle dry air and wind shear which should allow the storm to weaken in a hurry. By Monday, it's forecast to just be a remnant area of low pressure as it moves into the eastern Caribbean. 

UPDATE: 11AM Saturday July 7: 

Beryl is now a tropical depression and is expected to continue weakening into next week as conditions become more hostile in the Caribbean. The track has been shifted northward a bit and wind shear, dry air and land interaction should cause the storm to dissipate by early next week near Hispaniola. 

UPDATE: 8AM Saturday July 7: 

Beryl weakened overnight but still maintains hurricane status...barely. Max winds are now down to 75 mph. Beryl will move into an increasingly hostile environment over the next few days and further weakening is expected into early next week. The storm is still expected to degererate into a trough of low pressure by the middle of next week. 

UPDATE: 11PM Friday July 6: 

Beryl maintains winds of 80 mph and continues to quickly move west. Forecast track remains unchanged and still expected to dissipate next week before reaching Florida.


UPDATE: 11AM Friday July 6: 

Hurricane Beryl intensifies with winds of 85 mph. It now appears that the storm will maintain itself a little longer than previously expected with parts of the Lesser Antilles likely seeing tropical storm or hurricane conditions by this weekend. The storm will then make its way toward Hispaniola where it is expected to weaken and eventually meet its demise from land interaction or wind shear...or a combination of both. It is still not expected to be a threat to South Florida despite these latest developments. 

UPDATE: 5 AM Friday July 6:

Hurricane Beryl becomes first hurricane of the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season. Beryl continues to track west at 14 mph with winds of 75 MPH. A compact storm, hurricane-force winds only extend 10 miles outside of the center of the storm. Additional strengthening is forecast today, but Beryl is expected to quickly weaken to a Tropical Storm this weekend as it continues to track west toward the Lesser Antilles and dissipate by early next week. There is no threat to Florida. 

UPDATE: 10 PM Thursday July 5:

Beryl continues to strengthen as it tracks westward at 14 mph. Winds are now up to 65 MPH and is expected to become a hurricane by Friday afternoon. Weakening will still occur later this weekend as it encounters a more hostile environment over the Caribbean. It is still expected to dissipate by early next week. 

UPDATED 3:00PM EDT Thursday July 5:

We now have our second named storm of the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season. Tropical Storm Beryl  formed Thursday afternoon in the Atlantic. The storm will continue to move west with some slow strengthening possible into Friday.  Rapid intensification is NOT anticipated

Afterward. upper-level winds will become unfavorable for further strengthening. This combined with several other factors such as dry air and cooler than average water temps will lead to the system eventually degenerating into a trough of low pressure sometime next week as it approaches the Lesser Antilles. The system will remain weak as it moves westward. There is NO threat to Florida. 

Chief Meteorologist Derek Beasley

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