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Arthur likely to form this weekend

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Posted at 12:53 PM, May 12, 2020
and last updated 2020-05-16 14:27:59-04

UPDATE 5/16/20 2 PM

Hurricane hunter aircraft have been in the storm all Saturday afternoon and did record tropical storm force winds near the surface, but the area of low pressure remains broad and elongated. It is getting better organized, however, and a tropical storm is likely to form by Sunday. The storm is just offshore of the Florida coast and is wrapping some showers back into the area from the northeast but will continue moving away from the state through tonight.

FOX 4 CHIEF METEOROLOGIST DEREK BEASLEY

UPDATE 5/16/20 8 AM

The storm system is now bypassing Florida and remains disorganized over the northern Bahamas. NHC still gives it a HIGH chance for development into a subtropical depression or storm sometime this weekend as it heads north. Some of the latest computer models bring this system close to the Outer Banks of North Carolina with the American GFS model bringing the storm into Maryland and Delaware by Monday/Tuesday of next week. Still lots of questions, but what is known is that this storm will have little further impact on our state.

FOX 4 CHIEF METEOROLOGIST DEREK BEASLEY

UPDATE 5/14/20 9 PM

Chances for development remain high and we could see a subtropical storm form in the western Atlantic by this weekend. The system is still expected to only have minimal impacts on our area, in the form of gusty winds and a better chance for rain Friday. The best and highest rain chances will occur over on the East Coast.

FOX 4 CHIEF METEOROLOGIST DEREK BEASLEY

UPDATE 5/12/20 10 AM

We are keeping a close eye on an area of disturbed weather associated with a stalled front that could serve as a focus for tropical development later this week or this weekend. The National Hurricane Center has increased the probabilities for development in 5 days to HIGH.

This system will bring a continuation of gusty easterly winds to South Florida later this week, along with increased chances for showers and storms Friday. The storm will remain offshore and not directly affect the state, with the East Coast seeing the most significant impacts from rip currents and heavier surf, along with a chance for heavier rainfall.

While the system will remain weak and will not give us any serious problems, it is a reminder that hurricane season is fast approaching and you must be prepared BEFORE any storm arrives. Take this time to make sure you are ready for the upcoming season and know the plan of action you and your family will take in case we have to deal with one this season.

FOX 4 CHIEF METEOROLOGIST DEREK BEASLEY

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2020 STORM NAMES

Arthur Laura
Bertha Marco
Cristobal Nana
Dolly Omar
Edouard Paulette
Fay Rene
Gonzalo Sally
Hanna Teddy
Isaias Vickie
Josephine Wilfred
Kyle


HURRICANE TERMS TO KNOW

Tropical Storm WATCH: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within the specified coastal area within 48 hours.

Tropical Storm WARNING: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected within the specified coastal area within 36 hours.

Hurricane WATCH: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible somewhere within the specified coastal area. A hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

Hurricane WARNING: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified coastal area. A hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.