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Owners of Jeep stuck on Myrtle Beach raising money for Hurricane Dorian victims

Posted: 11:49 AM, Sep 10, 2019
Updated: 2019-09-10 11:49:17-04
Owners of Jeep stuck on Myrtle Beach raising money for Hurricane Dorian victims

It was the Jeep seen around the world.

As Hurricane Dorian approached South Carolina on Thursday, people on Myrtle Beach couldn’t help but stare — not at the hurricane but at the red Jeep Grand Cherokee that had been seemingly abandoned right on the beach.

The Jeep was driverless and stranded as it sat in the wind and high waters. Bystanders gathered around the vehicle. Some even stopped to pose for selfies with it.

Now, the owners of the Jeep have been publicly identified as they try to raise money for victims of Hurricane Dorian.

"We are trying to turn a negative situation into something positive," Brittany Feliciano, one of the owners of the Jeep, said on Facebook.

Brittany and Nick Feliciano are identified as the owners of the infamous Jeep on a new GoFundMe campaign seeking donations for victims of Hurricane Dorian. The two also used the GoFundMe page to clarify any misinformation about how the Jeep ended up on the beach.

"We loaned it to a family member a few weeks ago and he has been driving it since," the description on the campaign reads. "(Thursday) morning, he drove out on the beach before the sun came up and storm arrived, to get some video footage of the ocean. While driving he accidentally hit the drainage wall and got stuck. He immediately left to get help but all businesses were shut down and services inaccessible due to preparation for the storm. By the time he got back the tide was coming in and it was too late."

The owners of the Jeep also said they weren't seeking insurance money or publicity. According to Brittany Feliciano, the Jeep was paid off five years ago.

"We may have lost a vehicle but that is small in comparison to what others have lost during this storm," the GoFundMe page reads. "In honor of the red Jeep, we will be donating all funds to UNICEF (100% tax deductible) to help with the disaster relief in the Bahamas, as well as a direct wire transfer through the Bahamian government."